Category: History

Daily History Byte: Adonis: Europe’s oldest known tree

Scientists from Stockholm University, the University of Mainz, and the University of Arizona recently discovered this tree in Greece. There are a few other millennial trees in existence, but this one is the oldest known in Europe. A Bosnian pine (Pinus heldreichii) growing in the highlands of northern Greece has been dendrocronologically dated to be

HistTech: Trajan’s Column Interactive Graphic

National Geographic recently wrote an article about Trajan’s column and its history. They also included an interactive graphic which allows readers to explore the 126-ft tall column. And I’m not going to lie, it’s pretty neat. Trajan’s column commemorates the Roman emperor’s victory over the Dacians between 101 and 106 AD. Since then, the column,

Reflections on Richard III

I have followed the progress of Richard III over the past two-and-a-half years with great interest ever since archaeologists discovered the body in September 2012 amidst the ruins of Greyfriars Church in Leicester, UK. Last week. after heated debates surrounding his reburial, he was reinterred at Leicester Cathedral with ceremony due a deceased monarch (those

The Colossus of…Braavos?

(Warning: contains spoilers for Game of Thrones fans!) Back in January I started reading the series A Song of Ice and Fire, better known as the Game of Thrones books. Friends had told me that I would enjoy them (even before the show came out), being the fan of medieval Europe that I am. Five

When Twitter+History=Awesome: #AskHenryVIII

I have been on Twitter (@a_williams06 and @MyLifeIsHistory) for over four years now, and I find it awesome. I use my personal account to keep tabs on friends, institutions, favorite artists and celebrities, causes I care about, etc. My “professional” account (the one I use for this blog) is used for following Twitter accounts that

This Week in History: The Sinking of the Hunley

150 years ago, America was embroiled in one of the bloodiest wars ever fought on native soil: the American Civil War. 150 years ago, the North fought the South, brother fought brother, nation fought nation. 150 years ago, when the naval blockade of Southern ports threatened to choke the Confederacy, a little submarine defeated a

The Holing Game: The Curious Case of Hole v. White

(Editor’s note: This submission is from an English friend of mine, Hannah. I met Hannah when I studied in England in 2010, and she became one of my closest friends (especially because we were in the Lancaster University History Society together, and, well, that is awesome!) In early modern England slander and libel were a

5 Reasons I Still Love Halloween as An Adult

As I get older, I find myself adoring Halloween more and more. Of course, it has been some years since I feigned to be a country music singer, a princess, and a zombie soccer player, but it still does not mean the spirit of the holiday lessens for me. The following are 5 reasons Halloween

This Week in History: The Death of Jane Seymour

It could be said that King Henry VIII of England went through wives like tissues. I mean, seriously! After Catherine of Aragon and Anne Boleyn (his first and second wives respectively) kicked the bucket in 1536, good ol’ King Hal wed Lady Jane Seymour, daughter of Sir John Seymour of Wolf Hall in Wiltshire (a